Directorio Deco by Gloria Gonzalez

Jib Doors

Is there something more whimsical, unexpected and fun than having a jib door at home?Invisible storage, a private powder room, a hidden bar… whatever the reason these secret doors are used for, in all the cases a dose of mystery and instant fantasy are assured.

(Don’t feel bad if you didn’t know the meaning of Jib door until now. Not so long ago I didn’t know it either!)

Pauline de Rothschild in her Paris apartment bedroom, shot by Horst for Vogue UK (June 1969) Great jib door
Pauline de Rothschild in her Paris apartment bedroom. Horst for Vogue UK (June 1969)

 

Howard Slatkin NY Apartment. Jib Door
Howard Slatkin NY Apartment

 

Howard Slatkin NY Apartment. Jib Door
Howard Slatkin NY Apartment

 

Howard Slatkin NY Apartment. Jib Door
Howard Slatkin NY Apartment

 

Benedetta Cibrario's apartment in Milan. Jib Door
Benedetta Cibrario’s apartment in Milan. T Magazine

 

A large portrait of King Edward VII by Archibald Stuart Wortley cleverly disguises a pair of built-in wardrobe doors in the State Bedroom. Old Battersea House, London
A large portrait of King Edward VII by Archibald Stuart Wortley cleverly disguises a pair of built-in wardrobe doors in the State Bedroom. Old Battersea House, London

 

A New York apartment designed by architect John B. Murray and interior designer Cathy Kincaid
A New York apartment designed by architect John B. Murray and interior designer Cathy Kincaid. Overscale paisley by Lucy Rose Design. Veranda Magazine

 

De Gournay
De Gournay

 

Barry Dixon design. Gracie wallpaper
Barry Dixon design. Gracie wallpaper

 

Jib door. Hidden bar. Miles Redd
Miles Redd via Architectural Digest

 

Alexa Hampton's NY apartment.
Alexa Hampton’s NY apartment. Souce : Quintessence

 

Jib Door
Source unknown

 

Samarkand wallcovering by Pierre Frey
Samarkand wallcovering by Pierre Frey

 

Versailles
Versailles

 

Linda Evangelista by Steven Meisel for Vogue Italia, June 2008
Linda Evangelista by Steven Meisel for Vogue Italia, June 2008

 

Jib Door. World of Interiors
World of Interiors

 

Jemma Kind's Hampshire state. Fromemtal hand-painted wallcovering. Jib Door
Jemma Kid’s Hampshire state.The hand-painted silk wallcovering mural is by Fromental. Elle Decor

To read now and keep forever

I feel I can’t keep up with all the new fabulous book releases that have been happening in the last few weeks. Whether you need ideas for decorating your home, a present for that special interior design lover in your life, or inspiration for your next read, these books will be a win-win. Purchase them today and treasure them forever. These are the new classics you won’t regret buying.

‘Haute Bohemians’ Miguel Flores-Vianna. Foreword by Amy Tasley. Vendome.

 

'D. Porthault, the art of luxury linens' Brian D. Coleman. Photographs by Erik Kvalsvik. Foreword by Amy Astley.
‘D. Porthault, the art of luxury linens’ Brian D. Coleman. Photographs by Erik Kvalsvik. Foreword by Amy Astley. Rizzoli,

 

'How they decorated. Inspiration from great women of the Twentieth Century' P.Gaye Tapp. Foreword by Charlotte Moss
‘How they decorated. Inspiration from great women of the Twentieth Century’ P.Gaye Tapp. Foreword by Charlotte Moss. Rizzoli.

 

'At home with dogs and their designers' Susanna Salk. Foreword by Robert Couturier. Principal photography by Stacey Bewkes. Rizzoli
‘At home with dogs and their designers’ Susanna Salk. Foreword by Robert Couturier. Principal photography by Stacey Bewkes. Rizzoli

 

'David Hicks scrapbooks' Ashley Hicks. Vendome
‘ David Hicks scrapbooks’ Ashley Hicks. Vendome

 

Veranda. Inspired by Color, Clinton Smith, Hearst Books
Veranda. Inspired by Color, Clinton Smith, Hearst Books

 

'Renzo Mongiardino. A Painterly Vision' Martina Mondadori Sartogo. Rizzoli
‘Renzo Mongiardino. A Painterly Vision’ Martina Mondadori Sartogo. Rizzoli

 

 

In Conversation: Todhunter Earle

 Emily Todhunter founded her interior design business in 1988, with Kate Earle joining as her partner in 1998. Since then, the company has expanded rapidly both in size and scope. Projects range from English country houses to well-known restaurants, yachts, 5-star hotels and beautiful homes worldwide. 

Emily Todhunter, one half of this talented design duo, shares challenges, inspiration and more in today’s conversation.

Dear  Emily, first of all, I would like to know what are your biggest sources of inspiration.

I think I find inspiration in everything and anything that I am doing – all day long. Whether I am nosing through a coffee table book or Instagram, going for a walk on the downs, visiting an old English country house, in a museum, an art fair…wherever I am I am thinking about colour combinations and styles. If it had to be one source of inspiration, I suppose I would say that it was being brought up in lovely houses. I was very lucky.

Watercolor of a dining room in Scotland designed by Todhunter EarleWatercolor of a dining room in Scotland designed by Todhunter Earle

 

Over the years I’m sure that you have had many challenging projects, is there one that was particularly difficult?

I can’t think of any physical situation that has been too challenging. I am not at all fazed by the size or complexity of a project. What makes a project difficult is if there is an underlying family unhappiness that no amount of decorating can heal. We get so close to our clients and usually, we pride ourselves on our ability to lift and lighten everyone’s mood. We like to design happy houses and we usually do. But occasionally, (actually, only once I think!) the family dynamic was beyond repair. That was a real challenge!

A glamorous yet comfortable home in Belgravia by Todhunter EarleA glamorous yet comfortable home in Belgravia.

 

Favourite London interior

It’s probably very unimaginative but I do love the interior of the 5 Hertford Street. It’s so cosy and spoiling.

5 Hertford Street, London5 Hertford Street. Gloria González photography

 

  A colour you would never be tired of.

As a wall colour, I suppose I would never be tired of a Farrow and Ball’s ‘Downpipe’

Country home in Yorkshire by Todhunter Earle Countryhouse in Berkshire

 

Yachts, ski chalets, family homes…What’s your best advice to be able to do such diverse projects yet maintain a signature style in all of them?

I don’t think about it! I just follow my instinct and do whatever feels right at the time. I am not sure why I make the decisions I do. I just hurl it all together and hope for the best!

Swiss Chalet by Todhunter Earle                                                                      Swiss Chalet                                                                           

Any tips to adapt the English Country Style to modern times?

Yes – just simplify, reduce, lighten…but keep the character, keep the mementoes, don’t lose that evolved relaxed atmosphere, don’t be too precious. Reorganise the space so that the kitchen becomes the heart of the house. Gone are the days (sadly!) of having staff behind the green baize door. Open the house more to the garden, maximise the views through the windows. We used to need heavy curtains over the windows to keep out the draughts, but times have changed now, we have such good insulation so we ought to change our decorating accordingly and use lighter curtains and let the light flood in

Madresfield Court. Todhunter Earle Madresfield Court. Todhunter Earle
Madresfield Court
 

 Thank you so much, Emily!

For more information visit: http://www.todhunterearle.com

Images: Todhunter Earle unless otherwise specifically stated.