Directorio Deco by Gloria Gonzalez

Directorio Deco

Discovering Bermuda (Part II)

http://ortdestreffens.de/?yabloko=demokonten-f%C3%BCr-bin%C3%A4re-optionen&b4c=da One of the great discoveries of this trip was the Agricultural Exhibition. The Ag show, as locals call it, is a sweet annual event held each April at the Botanical Gardens. Over three days, the show combines the best of Bermuda’s agricultural, food, culture, equestrian and live entertainment. I loved to see how everybody – from children to adults – were so excited to see the winners in each category. It’s a true celebration of the flora, fauna and culture of Bermuda and it gave me a great insight into this enchanting island.

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opciones binarias estrategia osciladores I also found the visit to the Masterworks Museum very interesting. At the Masterworks Museum of Bermuda Art, you can experience Bermuda as seen through the eyes of artists like Winslow Homer, Georgia O’Keeffe, Charles Demuth, Jack Bush and Albert Gleizes among many others. Many of the paintings in the Bermudiana Collection are landscapes of this beautiful island paradise, and others reflect the unique warmth of Bermuda’s people and cultural heritage.

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Gts iqoption see url 1 minute binary option system Soldi facili con opzioni binarie Trading bonus gratuito Opzioni bunarie Trading on line A highlight of the trip was lunch at Coral Beach and Tennis Club. This Club is one of the most charming places I’ve ever visited. It feels like stepping into a Slim Aarons photo. All the fab details one would expect from an Old School Island club – Coral Beach Club has them all!

http://libraryinthesky.org/?bioeser=mujer-virtuosa-soltera&a58=ce Again, Dasfete arranged a table that left us all in awe, and yet again, the menu was exquisite.

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We (tried) to play croquet although some of us were more interested in the cute pink house at the end of the lawn. The person who had it rented saw our interest and was kind enough to let us peek in! It couldn’t be any more perfect…

 

The great art collection at the Hamilton Princess hotel is a must see. Andy Warhol, Yayoi Kusama, Ai Weiwei…museum worthy!

 

We also had time to sail on the classic sailboat ‘Calabash’.

 

For our last dinner, Sarah Bray prepared the most beautiful table at The Loren hotel. I was so happy to see the hand embroidered napkins by my talented friend Mariana Barran Goodall from Hibiscus Linens (every napkin had a different flower from Bermuda!). It looked so beautiful against the Indian block print tablecloth and with the sea as a backdrop, I couldn’t imagine a better ending for this fantastic trip.

Images: Gloria González

Discovering Bermuda (Part I)

Do you know when you come back from a Holiday and you can’t stop talking about the wonders of the place you’ve just visited? Well, this is happening to me at the moment with Bermuda so I thought that writing a blog post (actually two) about the wonders of this charming island was a necessity.

Gotham magazine editor-in-chief, Sarah Bray, alongside with Bermuda Tourism Authority organized a tailor-made Home and Garden Design Weekend for a small group of bloggers, interior designers and editors which I was honoured to be part of.

We stayed at the luxurious Rosewood Bermuda in Tuckers Point.  This exclusive resort has recently reopened after an extensive renovation and it couldn’t look any better – Island chic at its very best!

Rosewood Bermuda

Rosewood Bermuda

Rosewood Bermuda

Rosewood Bermuda

Rosewood Bermuda

Rosewood Bermuda

Rosewood Bermuda

Beach Club - Rosewood Bermda

inner at Rosewood  Beach Club with a stunning table curated by Aerin Lauder to celebrate the launch of AERIN's amenity line for Rosewood Bermuda. 'Coral Palm'  is the first-ever amenity line by AERIN and it features six luxurious bath and body products. The balmy, tropical blend is inspired by sunny days, indigo nights the bright blue sea,  and glorious coral sunsets which perfectly expresses Rosewood's A Sense of Place

Dinner at Rosewood  Beach Club with a stunning table curated by Aerin Lauder to celebrate the launch of AERIN‘s amenity line for Rosewood Bermuda. ‘Coral Palm’  is the first-ever amenity line by AERIN and it features six luxurious bath and body products. The balmy, tropical blend is inspired by sunny days, indigo nights the bright blue sea,  and glorious coral sunsets which perfectly expresses Rosewood’s A Sense of Place.

Aerin amenities for Rosewood Bermuda

Rosewood Bermuda will also introduce the AERIN fragance bar, a dedicated 24-hour Fragrance Bar featuring the complete collection of AERIN fragrances. Through this unique amenity, guests can borrow from a selection of AERIN fragrances, eliminating the hassle of packing yet another liquid.  From the moment they check in, guests can ring the Fragrance Bar at any time, and a butler will appear at their door, carrying a silver tray with AERIN’s luxurious fragrances for guests’ use.  After selecting the fragrance of their choice, guests will mist themselves and the Fragrance Butler will disappear with the tray until he or she is rung again. (How fabulous is this?!)Rosewood Bermuda will also introduce the AERIN fragance bar, a dedicated 24-hour Fragrance Bar featuring the complete collection of AERIN fragrances. Through this unique amenity, guests can borrow from a selection of AERIN fragrances, eliminating the hassle of packing yet another liquid.  From the moment they check in, guests can ring the Fragrance Bar at any time, and a butler will appear at their door, carrying a silver tray with AERIN’s luxurious fragrances for guests’ use.  (How fabulous is this?!)

 

Cultural Ambassador and local personality Kristin White gave us a fun and super interesting bike tour in the historic town of St. George’s

St George's , Bermuda

 

I loved visiting Ocean Sails workshop and the owner’s home (so special and unique!)

Ocean Sails, Bermuda
ocean sails, bermuda

 

Next stop was The  Bermuda Perfumery. This charming company has been offering exclusive fragrances made from the island’s flowers since 1928. All the fragrances are made on-site at the historic Stewart Hall. Owner and perfumer Isabelle Ramsay-Brackstone has created around two-dozen scents for men and women, like Coral from freesia, rose, ginger and clementine, that can’t be found anywhere else (only available on Bermuda or through the website)

The Perfumery, Bermuda
The Perfumery, Bermuda The Perfumery, Bermuda The Perfumery, Bermuda The Perfumery, Bermuda The Perfumery, Bermuda
The Perfumery, Bermuda

 

We finished the day with a magical dinner at a traditional Bermuda home called ‘Old Walls’, an old farmhouse built in the late 1700s located in Paget. The farmland was terraced and the gardens created some forty years ago. The two-acre property has a significant lime kiln, fish ponds, a folly and a slat house. I really enjoyed meeting the owners and it was so kind of them to open the doors for us. From the stunning table to the locally sourced products for the menu – everything was carefully designed by Selange Gitschner and Matthew Strong from citas hombres ecuador Dasfete

Dinner at Old Walls, Bermuda
 Old Walls, Bermuda Old Walls, Bermuda Old Walls, Bermuda
Folly - Old Walls, Bermuda
  Folly - Old Walls, Bermuda
Old Walls, Bermuda

To be continued…

Images: Gloria González

Tulip mania

Tulip season is a major event in Holland. Part of the country is transformed into a vast sea of flowers from mid-March to mid-May. It starts with crocus season in March, which is followed by daffodils and hyacinths. Finally, the tulips show their gorgeous colours, this is from mid-April through the first week of May. This flower originally came from Turkey but has become Holland’s symbol. How did that happen?

The Tulip was actually originally a wildflower growing in Central Asia. It was first cultivated by the Turks as early as 1000AD. Although the Dutch Tulipomania is the most famous, The first mania occurred way back in 1500’s in Turkey – which was the time of the Ottoman Empire and of Sultan Suleiman I (1494-1566). Tulips became highly cultivated blooms, developed for the pleasure of the Sultan and his entourage. During the Turkish reign of Ahmed III (1703-30) it is believed that the Tulip reigned supreme as a symbol of wealth and prestige and the period later became known as ‘Age of the Tulips’.

An Iznik Polychrome tile, Turkey, circa 1575 of square form painted in underglaze cobalt blue, viridian green, turquoise and relief red, outlined in black with tulips, saz and composite lotus and saz palmettes issuing from scrolling tendrils. Sotheby'sAn Iznik Polychrome tile, Turkey, circa 1575 of square form painted in underglaze cobalt blue, viridian green, turquoise and relief red, outlined in black with tulips, saz and composite lotus and saz palmettes issuing from scrolling tendrils. Sotheby’s

 

It was during the early 1700’s that the Turks began what was probably the first of the Tulip Festivals which was held at night during a full moon. Hundreds of exquisite vases were filled with the most breath-taking Tulips, crystal lanterns were used to cast an enchanting light over the gardens whilst aviaries were filled with canaries and nightingales that sang for the guests. Romantically, all guests were required to wear colours which harmonised with the flowers.

A tulip in a landscape within stencilled borders. Ottoman, 17th century. British Museum Collection.

A tulip in a landscape within stencilled borders. Ottoman, 17th century. British Museum Collection.

 

Tulips were imported into Holland in the sixteenth century. When Carolus Clusius wrote the first major book on tulips in 1592, they became so popular that his garden was raided and bulbs were stolen on a regular basis.

Tulips were originally a natural curiosity and a hobby for the extremely rich. The fascination with the tulips, its endless mutations and mystery, gave it an increasing value of immense proportions.

Double Portrait of a Husband and Wife with Tulip, Bulb, and Shells oil on panel painting by Michiel Jansz van Mierevelt, 1609  Sotheby's

Double Portrait of a Husband and Wife with Tulip, Bulb, and Shells oil on panel painting by Michiel Jansz van Mierevelt, 1609  Sotheby’s

 

Speculation on Tulip bulbs began building quickly as the middle and upper classes sought them as the ultimate symbol of wealth and prosperity. Along with aviaries of exotic birds and large, decorative fountains, there would always be Tulips in the garden of any self-respecting Emperor, King, Prince, Archbishop or member of the aristocracy. Often mirrors would be set up in the garden to give the illusion that the owner had been able to afford to plant many more tulips than he actually had.

Until 1630 the bulbs were grown and traded only between connoisseurs and scholars but more commercially minded people soon noticed the ever increasing prices being paid for certain Tulips and thought they’d found the perfect “get rich quick” scheme.
And so the popularity of the Tulip increased and more and more people became caught up in the trade.

It wasn’t long before the majority of the Dutch community became obsessed with these flowers. Those who could not afford the bulbs settled instead for art, furniture, embroideries and ceramics which featured the flowers.

Tulip vase, Adriaen Kocks, 1694. Royal Collection Trust, UK.   Many of Queen Mary II's Delft vases were described in the inventories of her palaces at Het Loo and Hampton Court as standing on the hearth. Flower vases such as these were used to ornament the fireplace during the spring and summer when fires were not lit. Each of the nine hexagonal stages was made separately, with a sealed water reservoir and six protruding grotesque animal mouths, into which the cut stems of tulips or other flowers could be placed.

Tulip vase, Adriaen Kocks, 1694. Royal Collection Trust, UK.   Many of Queen Mary II’s Delft vases were described in the inventories of her palaces at Het Loo and Hampton Court as standing on the hearth. Flower vases such as these were used to ornament the fireplace during the spring and summer when fires were not lit. Each of the nine hexagonal stages was made separately, with a sealed water reservoir and six protruding grotesque animal mouths, into which the cut stems of tulips or other flowers could be placed.

 

Many of the gorgeous Tulip watercolours painted during this period are now considered works of art but were, at the time, painted for catalogues with which to tempt buyers into ever more extravagant purchases. It was only ever the most expensive Tulips (ie those with ‘broken’ colour) which were painted.

Since bulbs were sold by weight, most people were speculating on the future weight of the bulb once it was dug.

Jacob Marrel, Four Tulips: Boter man (Butter Man), Joncker (Nobleman), Grote geplumaceerde (The Great Plumed One), and Voorwint (With the Wind), ca. 1635–45. Met Museum.

Jacob Marrel, Four Tulips: Boter man (Butter Man), Joncker (Nobleman), Grote geplumaceerde (The Great Plumed One), and Voorwint (With the Wind), ca. 1635–45. Met Museum.

 

The tulip’s popularity reached unprecedented, even excessive, heights, in the 1630s. This gave rise to a veritable tulipmania, which held many Dutchmen in its grip in 1636 and 1637. If the flower had initially roused largely scientific interest, from around 1630 on tulips became attractive financially. Tulips and tulip bulbs were bought and sold actively, frantically in fact, and this trade deteriorated into speculation in 1637. Countless people jumped on the bandwagon buying options they could pay later, some even putting up their homes as collateral. The market crashed suddenly in February 1637; prices plummeted and many investors were left penniless.

Tulip, two Branches of Myrtle and two Shells, Maria Sibylla Merian (attributed to) c. 1700. Rijksmuseum

Tulip, two Branches of Myrtle and two Shells, Maria Sibylla Merian (attributed to) c. 1700. Rijksmuseum

 

Jean Leon Gerome, The Tulip Folly, 1882, The Walters Art Museum

Jean Leon Gerome, The Tulip Folly, 1882, The Walters Art Museum

 

Susan Stewart 'Tulip Fire' Quilt, 2012, The National Quilt Museum

Susan Stewart ‘Tulip Fire’ Quilt, 2012, The National Quilt Museum

 

The people who speculated in tulips and tulip bulbs were the object of ridicule in countless pamphlets and prints. After all, vast sums were involved. Yet this way of doing business existed already in the 16th century, for instance in the grain trade. This was called grain futures, which is a polite word for speculation. Futures trading is still current; our present-day options exchange continues to work with a form of futures.

While interest in tulips remained undiminished after the crash in 1637, the market was no longer rife with excess and prices dropped to a more reasonable level. Tulips never lost their popularity, and growers in the west of Holland have continued to develop new varieties to this very day.

Tulips, Charlie McCormick

@mccormickcharlie

 

 

Tulips, The Landgardeners

@thelandgardeners

austria ha annuncio chi è di alta da eToro è aumento del valore che ti aiuters http://nlst-usa.com/?trere=à“Ñ“à’à -affidabile-iq-option San Juan cinema Grativo guadagno del servono solito ‘Some tulips last so long you could almost dust them off, and others you can’t trust overnight’ Constance Spry