Directorio Deco by Gloria Gonzalez

It’s all about the details

Seeing Red

For the last couple of weeks, my Instagram feed has been inundated with a plethora of reds: cherry, crimson, burgundies…even someone mentioned to me ‘Gloria, you love red!’ and I really do! So I thought it would only be appropriate to keep this red momentum going and share some of my favourite red interiors on the blog. As Franco-American couturière Pauline  Trigère and fellow red aficionado used to say ‘when you are feeling blue, think red’.

Betty and François Catroux’s 16th-century farmhouse, Les Ramades, photo by Tim Clinch for House & Garden.

alidad day bed redAlidad 

ines de la fressange home

ines de la fressange paris apartmentInes de la Fressange Parisian Apartment

Miles Redd. Veranda Magazine

Zanna Roberts Rassi manhattan play room in red and white

A very chic playroom! Zanna Roberts Rassi Manhattan apartment. One Kings Lane

Noemi Marone Cinzano portugese home decorated by John StefanidisNoemi Marone Cinzano Portuguese home decorated by John Stefanidis. Tour the full home here

Melanie Johnson @melathomeltd bedroom with headboard upholstered in Bennison Palampore fabric.

painted floor nick olsenLove the touch of red on this painted floor designed by Nick Olsen. Photo by Reid Rolls

nick olsen red lacquer libraryA Manhattan apartment by Nick Olsen. Photo by Maura McEvoy

‘Dark red is like a spice, it’s there to accentuate and to give balance. It is not the main ingredient. I would never paint a gargantuan room dark red because that would be too much of a good thing.’ Alessandra Branca

Alessandra Branca

charlotte moss red toileCharlotte Moss

‘All my life I’ve pursued the perfect red. I can never get painters to mix it for me. It’s exactly as if I’d said, “I want Rococo with a spot of Gothic in it and a bit of Buddhist temple” – they have no idea what I’m talking about.’ Diana Vreeland

diana vreelandDiana Vreeland by Horst.P. Horst

‘Red is the great clarifier – bright and revealing. I can’t imagine becoming bored with red – it would be like becoming bored with the person you love.’ Diana Vreeland

Decorating with Lebrillos

For the last few months, I’ve seen the traditional Spanish lebrillos de fajalauza (the characteristic ceramic from Granada) gracing walls, homes and stores all over the world. You might have seen them too, they are the huge ceramic bowls- usually green and white or blue and white- that people hang on walls, place on big tables or just lay them on the floor. Known in Spanish as lebrillos, they were traditionally used for cooking or for one’s personal hygiene. They have been around for centuries but lately, I started to see them outside Spain more and more often and I think we need to blame Instagram for the lebrillo revival.

You might remember this picture – it’s Veere Grenney house in Tangier and I’ve seen it in most of the Instagram accounts I follow – it kind of went viral when Architectural Digest posted the article back in March 2018

But before Grenney, Saint Laurent used the Spanish Lebrillos in Tangier at his and Berge’s Villa Mabrouka (I’ve always wondered if Greeney took inspiration from Mabrouka for his Tangier home)

Another Instagram account to ‘blame’ the popularity of Lebrillos is @volubilis_art This antiques store in Marbella has plenty of images with beautifully styled lebrillos that makes you want to fill your home with this attractive Spanish Ceramics.

 

The late Jaime Parladé used Lebrillos in many of his projects.

James Mortimer Photography

 

Ricardo Labougle photography

I love this pool Pavillion in Sotogrande by Melián-Randolph with a great balance between modern and traditional (You can read my interview with Sylvia Melián Randolph here)

 

If you are in America, you can find them at CASA GUSTO a beautiful store of antiques, objects, and artworks on Georgia Avenue in West Palm Beach Florida. The space is filled with goods old and new gathered and invented from around the globe. Their lebrillos are made in Mexico and inspired by traditional Andalusian designs.

Decorating with Intaglios

Intaglios were intended to preserve the arts and culture of ancient times, which had been lost throughout the centuries. Images were carved into stones and used to impress into wax seals. These carvings depict portraiture, renowned architecture, and celebrated scenes from ancient Rome and Greek mythology. In the 19th century, reliefs of these carvings were being reproduced in plaster form and became collectables

Plaster intaglios became to be used as mementoes for the Grand Tour travellers. these small carvings were collected during their travels. They would mount the intaglios into books and then make notes corresponding to each one as to his adventure that resulted in his buying or obtaining that stamp. By the end of the trip a traveller would have books filled with intaglios and notes that would last a lifetime.

Original set of  Grand Tour plaster intaglios, ‘Opere di Gibson’ circa 1830. The set is housed in a double-sided box designed as a book with half marbled boards with gilt lettered vellum spine, speckled ‘page edge’. Inside the front and back cover is a handwritten key describing the images on each of the cameos. 1stdibs

 

I find framed Intaglios a  highly effective way to decorate walls and they seem to always work well with both contemporary and traditional homes. Old or new, white or coloured, a simple framing or a playful one. Whatever is your choice, here are a few ideas on how to make the most of your collection.

As a lover of classical architecture and art,  there’s no surprise that Alexa Hampton often decorates with Intaglios. She makes them look uber chic in both her own bedroom and her guest bedroom.

 

The framed intaglios compliment beautifully the wallpaper pattern in this bedroom designed by Todd Richesin

 

It’s all about the contrast in this elegant space designed by Katie Ridder. The framed intaglios are from KRB. House Beautiful

 

From Intaglio-filled lamps to decoupage trays, Bridie Hall loves intaglios and she uses them in the most clever way.

 

If you’re are looking for unique framed intaglios, Parvum Opus is the place to go. The main designer and creative mind, Erika Stafanitti, also shares her ever-growing collection on Instagram – a must follow account for any Intaglio-Bindery lover.