Directorio Deco by Gloria Gonzalez

In Conversation

In Conversation: Luis Garcia Fraile

Since opening his Madrid studio in 2011, Luis Garcia Fraile has been working non-stop in both residential and commercial projects as well as one-of-a-kind events.  Halfway between traditional and contemporary, his interiors and designs never lack colour or pattern. Hard-working and equally charming, Luis has also become an ‘accidental’ influencer and his loyal Instagram followers love his interiors as much as his Sunday treats.

Discover Luis’s inspiration, favourite Madrid addresses and more in today’s conversation.

How would you describe your style?

I would say that the basis of my style is classic but with a twist. The pillars are ALWAYS classic and from there I move on, I add colour, prints and things that you may not expect to give it that twist.

Luis Garcia Fraile

Luis Garcia Fraile Interior Designer

 

What’s the favourite room or corner in your home?

I do not have a favourite spot at home. I actually move around my house a lot, depending on the time of the day and the light; I have my reading spot next to the fireplace. I like having breakfast on my yellow banquette in my kitchen… fills me with energy every morning and siesta in my green sofa.

luis garcia fraile madrid apartment

luis garcia fraile madrid apartment luis garcia fraile madrid apartmentThe designer’s Madrid Apartment featured in Elle Decor. Photography by Pablo Sarabia.

One of my favourite interior designers, the late Jaime Parlade, decorated your parents’ house and you met him on several occasions – did his work make any influence on your work?

I knew the late Jaime Parlade very well. As you know he decorated my parent’s house And I had the opportunity to “work” with him there… I was asked by my parents to be in charge of the project with him, when we finished my parents’ house he asked me if I wanted to do an internship with him. In the end, I decided to study for a degree in interior architecture at university. Before that, he had worked with my uncle Alfredo Fraile for many years creating the most wonderful homes for him around Spain. I can really say that it was thanks to him that now I am where I am and that I have been very influenced by his work; the way he mixed patterns and colours, the way he could pair a very expensive antique with a cheap Indian fabric…

5 Madrid favourites

Since I spend a lot of my time in Marbella ( I’m here right now ) I’m going the share my 5  key places between Madrid And Marbella ( hope you don’t mind )

Museo Del Prado in Madrid. For obvious reasons.

Hotel Alcuzcuz in Marbella. Home of the late Jaime Parlade. Although they have changed things a little you can have a glimpse of what his house looked like… it’s a very nice boutique hotel. (I wrote a blog post a few years ago about this home, you can read it here)

La fábrica de Hielo , Marbella. By far, the nicest store in Spain. Full of inspiring stuff. Jose Luis and Kitty ( the owners) together with Andres Sauceda have created the most incredible store you can imagine… You can’t miss it.

Hotel Marbella Club. Best hotel in Spain

Restaurante Horcher, Madrid. One of the oldest restaurants in Madrid. Amazing ambience, food is great and the service is top-notch.

la fabrica de hielo store marbella

la fabrica de hielo store marbellaLa Fabrica de Hielo in Marbella

Is there a common factor in all your projects?

I think that the use of vibrant colours and prints is something common in all of my projects.

.Luis Garcia Interior Designer

Luis Garcia Fraile Interior DesignerPablo Sarabia Photography.

Thank you so much, Luis!

For more information visit http://www.lgfstudio.com or http://www.instagram.com/luchogf

In Conversation: Pepa Yuste

After graduating in History & Geography in Madrid, Pepa Yuste moved to London and shortly thereafter started working in private banking for Citibank and Morgan Stanley. After banking, her love and passion for art, antiques and beautiful things lead her to a role at Sotheby’s London where she worked until she moved back to Madrid two decades ago. Since then, Pepa has worked as interior stylist., helping people reimagine their homes through pattern, colour and artwork. A self-confessed lover of table settings, she shares her passion for one of a kind tables on her Instagram account. In today’s conversation,  we discover a bit more about Pepa’s life, home and work.Pepa Yuste

 

Dear Pepa, when did your passion for interiors start?

It must have been during my childhood. My favourite game was to rearrange the furniture in my own room. I also think it was my mother’s “ fault”; she was an avid collector of objects to decorate the house. Our house was in constant change. Cushions, bedspreads, curtains and rugs would be changed with the seasons. She would also repaint the house and the garden furniture in different shades mostly every year. Under those influences, I guess it was difficult not to succumb to liking interiors so much.

Years later when I visited the British Galleries at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London for the first time, it must have been at the age of 16, I knew my passion for Interior Design would accompany me all my life.

Although I spent some years in banking in both Madrid and London, my background in History of Art took me to Sotheby’s London where I spent the happiest moments of my professional life. Every day was like going to a museum with the advantage that objects would change rapidly at the rhythm of the sales.

I have always been very interested in works of art and the decorative arts, but it was during those years in that great auction house that I trained the eye and learned to love Interiors even more.

 

pepa yuste madrid apartment

Pepa Yuste’s Madrid Apartment

In terms of decoration, how would you describe your style?

I like to consider my style as fresh, uncomplicated and contemporary but with sound references to traditional interiors. Interiors that are alive, where things can be changed or moved effortlessly, that are full of books and fresh flowers, and objects. I love arranging a collection of objects to enter into a dialogue with a modern painting or to refresh an antique piece of furniture. That is the part of decorating that I enjoy the most: styling and restyling.

Sometimes my job is to go to a client’s house, that has already been refurbished by interior designers, but with the task to reposition all the paintings and objects. On these occasions, I try to be respectful with the client’s belongings and do my best to make the most of them and give then a second opportunity.

I love interiors where you can guess the owner’s personality and interiors with soul.

pepa yuste Madrid Home

pepa yuste madrid apartment

Pepa Yuste Madrid ApartmentDetails at Pepa’s Madrid Apartment.

Manolo March Madrid home decorated by Pepa Yuste Manolo March Madrid home decorated by Pepa Yuste Manolo March Madrid home decorated by Pepa YusteManolo March’s Madrid home decorated with the help of Pepa Yuste. Photography Telva Magazine, Uxio da Vila.

Why do you think a beautiful, well-set table is important.

Whether it is for a supper with the family at home, a dinner party with friends, a garden party, a celebration or a formal dinner, I think that the atmosphere that you create is far more important than the food that you are serving. It is not just setting the table. It is setting the mood for the occasion. It is all about pampering your guests and to show them how much you care for them.

I love creating different table settings, as many as I can. To me, it is the only thing in the decoration of your house that you can change every day.

It is important to dedicate time to it, it is very rewarding as you can be so creative.

I believe that due to the strange circumstances that we are living at present, we are going to entertain more and more at home.

I like going out for dinner to a nice restaurant but to me, nothing compares to a dinner party at a friend’s house where they have put all their love and effort into entertaining you.

Pepa Yuste tablesetting

table by pepa yuste my vintage corner

Pepa Yuste tablesetting

Pepa Yuste Tablesetting

pepa yuste tablesetting

Favourite thing you have at home

That is so difficult to answer. I would say my family, but although I am trying no to be very materialistic these days, I have so many things that I would like to take with me if I were forced to go to a desert island. Maybe I will cheat and say my china cabinet, which sounds as if it is one thing only but in fact it is full of my beloved heirlooms from the family and all the dinnerware I have collected over the years.

Pepa Yuste China cabinet

Pepa's china cabinet

Where do you find inspiration for your tables and designs?

I am a great fan of textiles, and believe that fabrics are one of the things that make tables look interesting. I have been collecting fabrics for as long as I can remember. At first I would buy fabrics to reupholster chairs, sofas or other pieces of furniture, but after a while I realised that I would have to live several lives to use the amount of material that I have been acquiring over the years. That is when I started to make most of the fabrics that I had accumulated over the years into tablecloths to create different table settings.

I have probably inherited the inspiration from my mother who used to set tables with antique bed spreads and even a pair of old curtains from the dining room, and her tables would look amazing.

I am a very observant person and find inspiration in many places – mostly from my travels but it can also be in a painting that I see in an exhibition or in a nicely arranged bunch of flowers.

I very much like experimenting by placing some of the plates from my china cabinet on top of some of my different tablecloths and think about combinations. I mix and match a lot, don’t like to follow trends or fashions. I prefer to follow my heart and my own instinct.

I had a go at designing “The Collection by Myvintagecorner”, including several designs of tableware. Although it was my first incursion in the world of design it was very successful. The pieces were all limited Editions.

I may consider Part II in a while.

A plate designed by Pepa and part of My Vintage Corner Collection

Pepa Yuste Madrid Home

Pepa Yuste Madrid Apartment

Pepa Yuste Madrid Apartment

pepa yuste madrid apartment

Thanks so much, Pepa!

For more information visit http://www.instagram.com/myvintagecorner

In Conversation: Alfred Newall

After training at the Building Crafts College and working for Plain English Design Ltd, Alfred Newall established his Cabinet Making workshop in London and Sussex. Designing and making furniture inspired by historic pieces using traditional methods of joinery, his focus has always been on the qualities of simple design and proportion. Each piece is approached with a sensitivity towards the natural qualities of the wood, combining functionality, longevity and sustainably sourced materials.

Discover  Alfred’s inspiration, dream projects and what a day in the life of a modern craftsman looks like in today’s conversation.

Dear Alfred, first of all, I would like to know when did your love affair with wooden furniture start?

I always loved making things as a child. Furniture making then came whilst I was at school. I made friends with a technician who taught me to turn wooden bowls on a lathe from lumps found in local woodland. This then went on to become furniture making. I remember the excitement this gave me, being fully engrossed in a project and not able to think of much else during my other lessons!

alfred newall workshop with bobbin tables

Can you describe to us what a day in the life of a modern craftsman looks like?

A year ago my wife and I moved to Sussex where I set up a studio and workshop at the foot of the South Downs. We live 2 miles away and I bicycle along an ancient coach road each morning. I meet with my team at 8am and we have coffee and talk through what each maker has planned for the day. It’s great working with others and seeing multiple pieces of furniture come alive. We work on individual pieces but often help each other along the way. I spend the first couple of hours at my desk working on drawings and emails but try to get down to my work bench as soon as I can as that’s what I enjoy most. The days whizz past fast – making furniture occupies me mentally and physically in a lovely way. I aim to be back home with my wife and two little children at about 5.30pm, very dusty and ready for bath time.

What are the pieces you enjoy the most working on? What are the one or ones that have challenged you the most?

The variety of my work is refreshing. Bespoke pieces often bring challenges and overcoming them is satisfying and gives a sense of achievement. I also love developing new furniture and products. For the last couple of months I have been developing and prototyping a rush seated chair, working with a local rush weaver. I especially enjoy the collaboration element.

alfred newall collaboration with the new craftsmen

alfred newall collaboration with the new craftsmenAlfred Newall collection for The New Craftsmen

Alfred Newall Bobbin tableMy Bobbin table by Alfred Newall – one of my favourite pieces at home!

Where do you find inspiration?

Inspiration for me is in good supply. I am always seeing things I like and admire. It can be in local sale rooms, antique dealers‘ websites, historic furniture and design books or just catching a glimpse of something in the background in a film. In fact, I made a large oak table for a private dining room based on a table I’d seen in a set from The Crown.

What’s the most rewarding part of your job?

For me the reward is in seeing the furniture come together and look great. There is research and preparation before the method. The material has to be treated with respect and carefully handled. Quite often many components come together to make one piece and they need to be worked independently. It really is exciting when it comes together as one. It is also of course great when your client is happy and gets pleasure from the work.

alfred newall bobbin shelves octavia dickinson
Alfred Newall’s bobbin shelf in Octavia Dickinson London Flat featured in House & Garden. Rachel Whiting photography. 
Beata Heuman utility room
Utility room by Beata Heuman with cupboards by Alfred Newall. House & Garden. Paul Massey photography.

 

Alfred Newall Bobbin mirrorAlfred Newall’s new bobbin mirror  (available in any size or finish.)

What would be your ultimate dream project?

I really love ancient buildings. I feel my furniture looks best as a sum of parts in an environment or space. Whether it be the architecture of a building or works of art on a wall or other furniture in the room, if it all works together it’s a wonderful thing. My wife and I bought a 16th Century timber framed cottage and we plan on decorating it together with my vernacular furniture and her beautiful decorative painting – I’m really looking forward to that!

Tess NewallAlfred’s wife, Tess Newall hand-painting the medieval beams of their cottage. Tess is a wonderful decorative artist. Talk about a talented couple!

tess newall lampshades and alfred newall bobbin lampBobbin lamp by Alfred Newall and hand-painted lampshade by  Tess Newall.