Directorio Deco by Gloria Gonzalez

Inspiring Interiors

Hotel Mama

Last spring, Mallorca’s Grupo Cappucino opened the doors of their first hotel in Palma’s historic  Plaça de Cort. Juan Picornell, the successful entrepreneur behind the group, enlisted Jacques Grange to decorate the 19th-century building.

In true Grange style, Hotel Mamá boasts the designer’s bold vision, resulting in interiors that are elegant, timeless,  and very liveable.

The fresh take on classics, its richly layered look and all the handcrafted details throughout make this hotel a treat for any interior lover.

Aitana’s Suite – my favourite!

 

Deluxe Junior Suite

 

Deluxe Room

 

Cappuccino Grand Café

The private cinema

Rooftop pool

Among other services, the HOTEL MAMA offers a sumptuous spa, rooftop pool, gym, the Cappucino Grand Café, a Japanese restaurant and a cinema (whose idea comes from Palazzo Margherita, the hotel that Grange designed for the scriptwriter and director Francis Ford Coppola in Italy) in which “the best films” will be screened.

“It adjusts your internal mood right away,” Grange observes of Hotel Mamá’s infectious effervescence. “It’s all about happiness—‘We feel cozy, we feel charming, we feel poetic.’ It’s magique, no?”

 

Hotel Mama

Plaza de Cort, Palma de Mallorca, Balearic Islands

07001 Spain

+34 871 037 437  info@hotelmama.es

 

Images: Hotel Mamá and Booking.com

Comporta Style

“With its untouched beaches, patchworks of rice paddies, rustic cabanas and thatched roof huts, Comporta is the ideal destination for those looking to wander off course. Welcome to the blissful beauty of simplicity”  Carlos Souza & Charlene Shorto

For many decades, Comporta has been one of Portugal’s best-kept secrets, but in the last few years, this charming coastal town has become the place jet-setters are praising about.

This rice-farming village has attracted a demanding clientele who enjoys the simplicity and raw beauty that Comporta offers.  Christian Louboutin, Jacques Grange or Philippe Starck are some of the happy few who own houses here.

Fortunately, the arrival of those high-profile visitors doesn’t seem to have altered Comporta’s character. The low-key village is plain rather than pretty, but it has a setting unlike anywhere else.

 

Comporta Bliss - Carlos Souza , Charlenr Shorto . Assouline

Comporta is the new place everybody has their eyes on” enthuses the well-travelled Carlos Souza.  “It’s like St.-Tropez in the 1960s, Ibiza [in the ’90s]; it’s very, very laid-back, really incredible” Carlos Souza and Charlene Shorto share their love for Comporta in this must-have book, recently published by Assouline. 

Chez Suzanne Syz. Comporta Bliss by Carlos Souza and Charles Shorto - AssoulineChez Suzanne Syz. Comporta Bliss by Carlos Souza and Charles Shorto – Assouline (via Vogue)

A chapel on Pedro Espirito Santo's estate. Comporta Bliss by Carlos Souza and Charles Shorto - AssoulineA chapel on Pedro Espirito Santo’s estate. Comporta Bliss by Carlos Souza and Charles Shorto – Assouline ( via Vogue)

Chez Marina Espirito Santo. Comporta Bliss by Carlos Souza and Charles Shorto - AssoulineChez Marina Espirito Santo. Comporta Bliss by Carlos Souza and Charles Shorto – Assouline (via Vogue)

One hour south from Lisbon, between the municipalities of Alcácer, do Sal and Grândola, you come across a breathtaking landscape. 7.5 miles of white sandy beaches and crystalline sea within a 37 miles coastline, surrounded by the dunes and pine trees and irrigated by immense verdant rice paddies.

But why a wonderful place like this has remained so well preserved? Well, until not so long, most part of the land belonged to a single estate, the Herdade de Comporta. It was owned and protected by the Espirito Santo family, one of Portugal’s oldest and most influential banking families. They only allowed a few houses to be built, always following high design standards.
In 2014, the estate in Comporta passed predominantly to the hands of the bail-out banks, opening up the area for the first time. Since then, the main goal for the Herdade de Comporta is to develop a high-quality tourist destination and to become a model for sustainable development in Europe, while still operating as an agricultural estate and preserving its environmental and cultural heritage.

Stork Club, Jacques Grange & Pierre Passebon flagship store in Setubal, Comporta.Stork Club, Jacques Grange & Pierre Passebon flagship store in Setubal, Comporta.

Jacques Grange’s compound in Comporta is a collection of houses that are enjoyed by himself and friends. A series of rough-hewn cabanas cradled in a valley of dunes in the Alentejo region with landscape design by Louis Benech.

Grange discovered Comporta more than 30 years ago thanks to his friend Vera Iachia, a member of the Espirito Santo family, who owned the land the cabanas are on. The family had donated much of the land to form a nature preserve, where new construction was forbidden. But Grange managed to persuade the matriarch of the family to sell him a parcel of the land.

Jacques Grange ,ComportaJacques Grange ,ComportaJacques Grange ,ComportaMarie Claire  Maison Italy

“It’s very funny to live in a straw house It’s chic rustique,” Grange says.

Jacques Grange ,Comporta

Jacques Grange ,Comporta Jacques Grange ,ComportaAD Magazine. Jérôme Galland photography

 

Jacques Grange ,Comporta Jacques Grange ,Comporta Jacques Grange ,Comporta Jacques Grange ,Comporta Jacques Grange ,ComportaL’Officiel. Young-Ah Kim photography

 

'Casa Françoise' Françoise Dumas home in Comporta by Jacques Grange

'Casa Françoise' Françoise Dumas home in Comporta by Jacques Grange

'Casa Françoise' Françoise Dumas home in Comporta by Jacques Grange‘Casa Françoise’ Françoise Dumas home in Comporta by Jacques Grange

 

A Cabana in Comporta by Vera Iachia. She is most renown for the "Comporta Lifestyle," for which she was the originator, with interiors, architecture and product design that marry a traditional Portuguese fisherman's vernacular with her seamless signature contemporary aesthetic A Cabana in Comporta by Vera Iachia. She is most renown for the "Comporta Lifestyle," for which she was the originator, with interiors, architecture and product design that marry a traditional Portuguese fisherman's vernacular with her seamless signature contemporary aesthetic A Cabana in Comporta by Vera Iachia. She is most renown for the "Comporta Lifestyle," for which she was the originator, with interiors, architecture and product design that marry a traditional Portuguese fisherman's vernacular with her seamless signature contemporary aestheticA Cabana in Comporta by Vera Iachia. She is most renown for the "Comporta Lifestyle," for which she was the originator, with interiors, architecture and product design that marry a traditional Portuguese fisherman's vernacular with her seamless signature contemporary aestheticA Cabana in Comporta by Vera Iachia. She is most renown for the "Comporta Lifestyle," for which she was the originator, with interiors, architecture and product design that marry a traditional Portuguese fisherman's vernacular with her seamless signature contemporary aesthetic A Cabana in Comporta by Vera Iachia. She is most renown for the "Comporta Lifestyle," for which she was the originator, with interiors, architecture and product design that marry a traditional Portuguese fisherman's vernacular with her seamless signature contemporary aesthetic A Cabana in Comporta by Vera Iachia. She is most renown for the "Comporta Lifestyle," for which she was the originator, with interiors, architecture and product design that marry a traditional Portuguese fisherman's vernacular with her seamless signature contemporary aesthetic A Cabana in Comporta by Vera Iachia. She is most renown for the "Comporta Lifestyle," for which she was the originator, with interiors, architecture and product design that marry a traditional Portuguese fisherman's vernacular with her seamless signature contemporary aesthetic A Cabana in Comporta by Vera Iachia. She is most renown for the "Comporta Lifestyle," for which she was the originator, with interiors, architecture and product design that marry a traditional Portuguese fisherman's vernacular with her seamless signature contemporary aesthetic A Cabana in Comporta by Vera Iachia. She is most renown for the “Comporta Lifestyle,” for which she was the originator, with interiors, architecture and product design that marry a traditional Portuguese fisherman’s vernacular with her seamless signature contemporary aesthetic. She works extensively with materials of the region and with the local craft and artisans who skillfully interpret her ideas. Photography: Nicolas Matheus + Guido Taroni 

 

Parisian antiquaire Patrick Perrin and his family compound in Comporta Parisian antiquaire Patrick Perrin and his family compound in Comporta

Parisian antiquaire Patrick Perrin and his family compound in Comporta. Architectural Digest

 

The multi-purpose dining room

Comfort is the essential element of a successful interior and the hallmark of the Parish-Hadley style. In the book Sister Parish Design – On Decorating, Libby Cameron, Sister’s last protégé, and Susan B.Carter, Sister’s granddaughter, explore this aspect and much more in a series of conversations with leading decorators.

I find this book not only a very entertaining read but also very useful, with a lot of tips and valuable information for any decorator or interior design aficionado. The first chapter analyzes the rooms of a home. It’s very interesting to see that the part dedicated to the dining room is cleverly called ‘The underused dining room’. It’s a fact that the dining room is probably the least used room in a home (if you’re lucky enough to have one, of course!) That’s why more and more often we see library/dining rooms, dining rooms/studies or dining rooms located in unexpected places like a hallway.

Below I’m sharing some advice from the earlier mentioned book and great examples that will hopefully help you to create a dining room that is actually used and lived in.

Dining rooms are rooms that sometimes need to double up as another room; libraries and dining rooms are obviously wonderful together   

E M M A  B U R N S 

Carolina Irving's Paris dining room reveals her vast collection of reference materials, carefully organized for easy inspiration. By day, Carolina employs the space for research and work and in the evening it is home to frequent dinner parties. Jansen oak chairs are upholstered with her own Kandily pattern. Mileu Magazine

Carolina Irving’s Paris dining room reveals her vast collection of reference materials, carefully organized for easy inspiration. By day, Carolina employs the space for research and work and in the evening it is home to frequent dinner parties. Jansen oak chairs are upholstered with her own Kandily pattern. Mileu Magazine

 

Caroline Sieber's dining-room library is crowded with the monographs that Caroline drew on for inspiration to design her London home —Jacques Grange, Elsie de Wolfe, and Madeleine Castaing among them. A panel of Braquenie's Tree of Life hangs on the window. Vogue UK. Oberto Gili photography

Caroline Sieber’s dining-room library is crowded with the monographs that Caroline drew on for inspiration to design her London home —Jacques Grange, Elsie de Wolfe, and Madeleine Castaing among them. A panel of Braquenie’s Tree of Life hangs on the window. Vogue UK. Oberto Gili photography

 

There is this convention: oh, I have a dining room, so I have to put the table in it. I say, don’t do that. Okay, if you are going to use it as a dining room, fine. But you could make it a library and do something else with the library, if there is one. Just use your house in a way that is useful to you 

 B U N N Y   W I L L I A M S 

 

Frank de Biasi and Gene Meyer Manhattan apartment

The library-dining room-office in Frank de Biasi and Gene Meyer's Park Avenue apartment. 'At 7:15AM  I make my way to my weekday home office—the end of our dining room table. This is a George III mahogany table (ex-Christie’s) with the sole weekend function of hosting dinner parties' Architectural Digest 

The library-dining room-office in Frank de Biasi and Gene Meyer’s Park Avenue apartment. ‘At 7:15AM  I make my way to my weekday home office—the end of our dining room table. This is a George III mahogany table (ex-Christie’s) with the sole weekend function of hosting dinner parties’ Architectural Digest 

 

Vermont home by Billy CottonVermont home by Billy Cotton

 

Robin Lucas 

I love the idea of not having a complete set of dining chairs. Nancy Lancaster did this. She would often have a pair of tall and skinny wing chairs at the head of the table and single chars around it.  (…) Dining rooms can often feel like dead rooms. Quite often people don’t have a nice dining table so I will just make the table out of chipboard and put a floor-length cloth over it and overlay this with another cloth on top for dining. That can look fantastic and the focus will become the chairs around the table. You can paint chairs and cover them in endless different ways      

 E M M A   B U R N S 

Emma Burns designed a delightful and inviting dining room in London using an eclectic mix of furniture, rich colors, charming objects and paintings. The variety of chairs adds to the interest of the room. Illustration by Mita Corsini Bland. 

Emma Burns designed a delightful and inviting dining room in London using an eclectic mix of furniture, rich colors, charming objects and paintings. The variety of chairs adds to the interest of the room. Illustration by Mita Corsini Bland. 

 

I like to encourage people to combine the dining room and make it a room that is used. Perhaps it contains a collection of things – or maybe the best solution is to make it into a library. You can add bookcases and still have your dining table, but there are more ways to use the room. You can have the dining table at one end of the room, and if it’s a living room combination, then you can make the other end more of an area where you gather around       

A L B E R T   H A D L E Y 

A dining room by Albert Hadley. It has a light blue ceiling, a favourite Hadley hue for the upper plane. The American Empire mahogany armoire is topped by a Tibetan gong. Next to them are two works on paper by Connecticut artist Mark Sciarillo, also a metalworker, who made the sculpted bronze base of the living room's coffee table. The vellum lampshade, the Eyelet gold-on-ivory wallpaper, and the chairs are all Hadley's designs. Fernando Bengoechega photography. House Beautiful

A dining room by Albert Hadley. It has a light blue ceiling, a favourite Hadley hue for the upper plane. The American Empire mahogany armoire is topped by a Tibetan gong. Next to them are two works on paper by Connecticut artist Mark Sciarillo, also a metalworker, who made the sculpted bronze base of the living room’s coffee table. The vellum lampshade, the Eyelet gold-on-ivory wallpaper, and the chairs are all Hadley’s designs. Fernando Bengoechega photography. House Beautiful

 

The Manhattan Apartment of Albert Hadley

The Manhattan Apartment of Albert Hadley

 

Albert Hadley's former country house in Tarrytown, New York.

Albert Hadley’s former country house in Tarrytown, New York.

 

At Gateley Hall in Norfolk, owner Vivien Greenock has used her expertise as an interior designer to restore the once neglected eighteenth-century house and decorate it in a quintessential English style. In the entrance hall, which doubles as a dining room, eighteenth-century chairs surround a large circular table and a collection of Delftware is framed by the plasterwork above the chimneypiece. From the July 2014 issue of House & Garden.

At Gateley Hall in Norfolk, owner Vivien Greenock has used her expertise as an interior designer to restore the once neglected eighteenth-century house and decorate it in a quintessential English style. In the entrance hall, which doubles as a dining room, eighteenth-century chairs surround a large circular table and a collection of Delftware is framed by the plasterwork above the chimneypiece. From the July 2014 issue of House & Garden.

 

Argentinian architect Mario Connio has chosen a striking jade green for the walls in the dining room of his Andalucian farmhouse. Family portraits and pictures by Mario's friends are a well considered personal touch. House & Garden

Argentinian architect Mario Connio has chosen a striking jade green for the walls in the dining room of his Andalucian farmhouse. Family portraits and pictures by Mario’s friends are a well considered personal touch. House & Garden

Evangeline and David Bruce’s London dining room at Albany, decorated circa 1970 by Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler. Photo: John Vere Brown, copyright Colefax & Fowler

Evangeline and David Bruce’s London dining room at Albany, decorated circa 1970 by Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler. Photo: John Vere Brown, copyright Colefax & Fowler

 

You really have to know a lot about people and how they live. Where do they have dinner? If they don’t entertain, why use the dining room for dinner parties for fourteen people who are never going to show up? Do something else interesting with it

B U N N Y   W I L L I A M S