Directorio Deco by Gloria Gonzalez

January Favourites

Scala Regia Issue 4 – Leisure & Pleasure  Scala Regia magazine never disappoints. Every issue is a celebration of life and beauty. Wonderful articles on Arts, culture, talents, personalities, interiors, fashion and the stories within history.

A dispute with disquiet. A Dior exclusive for this issue's cover story.
A dispute with disquiet. A Dior exclusive for this issue’s cover story.
Behind the scenes captured by Editor in Chief Diogo Mayo
Behind the scenes captured by Editor in Chief  Diogo Mayo
Luxury of Leisure – The rise of Informal dress in the age of enlightenment
Quilting the past – In Conversation with Jean-Charles de Ravenel
Alluring Arlesians. Antoine Raspal and the birth of the portrayal of fashion in Arles.
Seeing as an exercise – The photography of Francis Hammond.

 

Jemma Lewis Marbling: Jemma is a producer of fine hand marbled papers with a mesmerizing Instagram account!

 

Valentino Spring 2018 Couture: If I have to sum up this collection in one word it would be Sublime.

Images: Vogue

La Oficial Cerámica: A wonderful store in Madrid selling Portuguese crockery by weight.

 

Gina LangfordI love Gina’s fresh take on custom heraldry and monograms. Everything she does is Oh so pretty!

Robin Verrier photography

 

 

The Embroideries of Lagartera

The commission to decorate the library of the Hispanic Society of America decisively marked the life of Sorolla, not only because of the commitment to transmit to the American public an image of the country that reflected the national identity but also because it prevented him from dedicating valuable time to other artistic endeavours.

The process of creating the panels obliged Sorolla to travel throughout Spain taking notes and studies of nature, both large monuments and scenes, which he then composed in a laborious puzzle whose final result is an accurate mirror of life in Spain.

Lagartera Bride , Joaquin Sorolla , 1912

He began his journey in Lagartera. This canvas painted in the spring of 1912 was a preparatory study for the panel dedicated to Castilla, ‘The bread festival’. On this painting, a ‘Lagartera bride’ is surrounded by ‘Lagarteranos’, all dressed in the traditional intricate costume from Lagartera.

A girl from Lagartera wearing a traditional costume in 1914. Photography by Jules Gervais-Courtellemont for National Geographic
A girl from Lagartera wearing a traditional costume in 1914. Photography by Jules Gervais-Courtellemont for National Geographic

Since the 16th century, the small Spanish village of Lagartera (Toledo) has been famous for its exquisite embroidery which, in my opinion, is one of the most exquisite examples of Spanish craftsmanship. These embroideries are traditionally worked on hand-woven linen, using lively colours and the satin stitch and double running stitch techniques

Antique Lagartera Embroidery

 

The origin of these embroideries started with the Coptic Culture that developed in Egyptian territory between the years 313-641. During this period,  Coptic art was flourishing with advanced technology which was developed in the looms and weaves, creating some beautiful embroideries of Byzantine influence, but also mixed with a perfect classical order by Hellenic influence.

Coptic Embroidery
Coptic embroidery motifs

When the Arabs dominated Egypt, they welcomed their culture, especially in their sumptuary arts and in particular their embroideries, which spread throughout their areas of influence: Syria, the Caucasus, Maghreb and Al-Andalus (Muslim Spain).

Coptic Embroidery , Ana Abascal Antiques
Fragments of Coptic embroideries at Ana Abascal Antiques store

The Mozarabs (Christians who lived in an area governed by Arabs, but maintaining their Christian religion and their Spanish laws), took much influence from the Arab culture, especially in the language, gastronomy, weddings as well as in the sumptuary arts especially in dress, fabrics and decoration or embroidery thereof.

The existence of Mozarabic populations in Lagartera is demonstrated in the document of 1281 published by Ángel Barrios in his work “Documents of the Cathedral of Ávila” . These Mozarabs would be the ones who adapted the  Coptic-Arab embroideries among their natives and have remained to this day.

Lagartera Embroidery

For more than eight centuries, the Lagartera embroideries have been shaped by different styles and influences. Renaissance designs can be seen in some religious scenes embodied in bedding. Also, we can see eighteenth-century influence taken from the designs of the Royal Silk Factories at Ávila, Talavera de la Reina and Oropesa, as well as some ornamental motifs from the nearby ceramics of Puente del Arzobispo and Talavera de la Reina.

Lagartera Embroidery

These embroideries were traditionally used for clothing as well as for home furnishing. Below you can see some stunning pictures that my friend Miriam took a couple of years ago during the Corpus Christi. For this celebration, the facades of Largatera are decorated with different textiles pieces, altars are placed on the doors of the homes and the people from Lagartera dresses with the traditional costumes.

Corpus Christi in Lagartera. Popular Costume

Corpus Christi in Lagartera. Popular Costume Corpus Christi in Lagartera. Popular Costume

Corpus Christi in Lagartera Corpus Christi in Lagartera

Information about the origin of the Lagartera embroidery –  Ciudad de las Tres Culturas Blog  

Tory Burch: a new take on the past

On today’s blog post I’m analyzing some of Tory Burch’s decorating inspirations.

 H U B E R T   D E  G I V E N C H Y 

Tory Burch’s green velvet sofa is a clear homage to Hubert de Givenchy’s sofa in his 18th-century Parisian townhouse.

Tory Burch NYC Apartment. The sofa was designed as an homage to Hubert de Givenchy. Daniel Romualdez design

Hubert de Givenchy in his 18th-century Parisian townhouse at rue de Grenelle
Hubert de Givenchy in his 18th-century Parisian townhouse at rue de Grenelle

 

Not only the sofa, but Givenchy’s green velvet walls seem to be another inspiration for Tory’s own home.

Tory Burch New York Apartment. François Hallard photography
Tory Burch New York Apartment. François Hallard photography
Hubert de Givenchy's Parisian salon.
Hubert de Givenchy’s Parisian salon. WSJ. Francis Hammond photography

 

Georges Geffrey
And the room by Georges Geffrey that probably inspired them all.

 

The stunning  Diego Giacometti table  (created c.1976 for the decorator Henri Samuel) looks wonderful in both, Tory Burch’s Southampton home and Hubert de Givenchy’s La Jonchet. The one at La Jonchet was sold by Christie’s last March for 3,770,500 €. I’ve been wondering if Tory Burch was the buyer

Tory Burch's Southampton home.
Tory Burch’s Southampton home. Oberto Gilli photography. AD
Hubert de Givenchy's la Jonchet,
La Jonchet. Christie’s

 

L E E   R A D Z I W I L L 

Lee Radziwill’s former NYC bedroom is a clear influence for Tory Burch’s Southampton bedroom.

Tory Burch's Southampton home. AD September 2017. Oberto Gili photography.

Tory Burch's Southampton home

Tory Burch’s Southampton home. AD September 2017. Oberto Gili photography.

 

Lee Radziwill's former New York Apartment. AD August 1975
Lee Radziwill’s former New York Apartment. AD August 1975

 

 B I L L Y   B A L D W I N 

In Burch’s ‘Blue Room’, sofas and walls are covered in Quadrille’s Arbre de Matisse fabric. Billy Baldwin created this design in the 60s inspired by Matisse’s work.

Tory Burch's 'Blue Room' covered in Arbre de Matisse fabric by Quadrille
Noa Griffel photography. Tory Daily.

 

Woodson Taulbee's Manhattan apartment designed by Billy Baldwin. Baldwin created this patterned textile to match his client's Matisse, above
Woodson Taulbee’s Manhattan apartment designed by Billy Baldwin. Baldwin created this patterned textile to match his client’s Matisse, above

 

 

The inspiration for the use of overscale animal paintings in Tory’s home might have also been inspired by Billy Baldwin’s NY apartment.

Billy Baldwin's NY apartment
Billy Baldwin’s NY apartment

 

 

D A V I D   H I C K S

David Hicks has been a longtime inspiration for Tory Burch. Hicks fearless love of colour and geometry have not only influenced the Tory Burch’s stores interiors but the logo, too. He also has inspired one of Burch’s latest catwalk collections.

David Hicks on decoration - with fabrics

Tory Burch's logo

Tory Burch's SoHo Store in 2008. The New York Times
Tory Burch’s SoHo Store in 2008. The New York Times

 

David Hicks
Interior by David Hicks

 

Tory Burch Milan store
Tory Burch Milan store. WWD 2012.

 

B U N N Y   M E L L O N 

As for many Americans, Tory Burch’s love for topiaries seems to have been inspired by the late style-setter and philanthropist Bunny Mellon.

 

Bunny Mellon in May 1982. She cultivated miniature topiaries, grown from rosemary, myrtlr, thyme and santolina setting off a National Trend. Fred Conran Photography. New York Times.
Mellon in May 1982. She cultivated miniature topiaries, grown from rosemary, myrtlr, thyme and santolina setting off a National Trend. Fred Conran Photography. New York Times.

 

Tory Burch in her Southampton home. Topiary galore
Tory Burch in her Southampton home. Oberto Gilli photography. AD

 

Topiaries are present in Tory's homes, stores and offices. Here are shown with Dodie Thayer for Tory Burch Dinnerware.
Topiaries are present in Tory’s homes, stores and offices. Here are shown with Dodie Thayer for Tory Burch Dinnerware.

 

Tory Burch's NY office
Tory Burch’s NY office. AD

 

Tory Burch's dining room in her Southampton home. Iksel decorative arts on the walls
Burch’s dining room in her Southampton home. Oberto Gilli photography. AD